Author Topic: Tying chironomids  (Read 3495 times)

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Ron Thompson

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Tying chironomids
« on: January 21, 2014, 08:34:57 AM »
So how many different chironomids do you tie; how many different sizes? I know when I tie chironomids I tie a set number and in sizes from 18 to 10. Say for instance I will tie black & red white bead in all the sizes that I have listed and tie a dozen of each and I tie them on 2499 SP BL, but I will also tie them in bomber sizes.
    I tie many different colors with black bead and some with white beads.
Black & Red
Gunmetal
Chromies
Anti static bag
Black & Silver
Black & Gold
Brown
Greens
Olives
I tie numerous shades of greens, olives, and browns with different ribs and beads (usually oversized beads).
That not talking about the different variations with a red butt, and all the colors that I missed talking about it has taken years to tie all the different colors and sizes in my fly boxes. I use one large boat box another medium size box, and one small box (16"x21"). I still run out of room and still don't have enough chironomids. :-\
ron
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Randy Paskall

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Re: Tying chironomids
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2014, 04:18:31 AM »
One of the reasons I'm not into the crawnie game heavily is I just can't tie that many of the same fly before I go batty. I tie in 3s 1 to fish, one to share and one to have when I lose the one I'm fishing.
I have about 10 patterns I rotate through. I tend to fish 16s to 10s and start with a 14 unless I see something on the water that tells me otherwise. Most used pattern would be a dark green flashabou with a copper or silver rib.
Sorry, but you weren't catching that fish anyway.....

Gordon Kalisch

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Re: Tying chironomids
« Reply #2 on: January 28, 2014, 06:26:34 AM »
Too many!! My problem is deciding which one to use.

Mark Yoshida

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Re: Tying chironomids
« Reply #3 on: May 08, 2015, 10:32:20 AM »
Did you make these fly boxes, or where did you purchase them. Never have seen them in Washington shops.

Ron Thompson

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Re: Tying chironomids
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2015, 05:59:36 PM »
The boxes were custom made in Kamloops I had two different suppliers one which retired and the other used to supply my store til I closed.
ron
Fishing is not about fish.
THE TUG IS THE DRUG
Do you want flies with that order.
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Matt Endrizzi

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Re: Tying chironomids
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2015, 07:53:05 AM »
Amazing selection Ron..... but I don't see too many bloodworms, don't tell me you have more boxes full of those  ;)

My collection is growing, but I don't think I'll ever have even half as many as that lol.  I try to hit all the basic colors (and a few attractor blue/purple/pink) and mix up the rib colors some with beads and some more natural style.  Yet every season I catch or pump another variation that gets me back to the bench.

I agree with Gordon, with that many where do you start?!  I know black and red :)

Matt
« Last Edit: May 19, 2015, 06:09:09 PM by Matt Endrizzi »

Ron Thompson

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Re: Tying chironomids
« Reply #6 on: May 20, 2015, 05:12:14 PM »
Hi Matt how you been; most of my patterns come from what I have seen in the water over the years and I use certain flies for certain waters. I rarely use a black and red anymore I have my own patterns to use. Being a fishing fanatic when I was younger I got to develop patterns and the guiding I did helped as well.
ron
Fishing is not about fish.
THE TUG IS THE DRUG
Do you want flies with that order.
www.thekamloopsflyshop.blogspot.ca

Gary Hanke

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Re: Tying chironomids
« Reply #7 on: August 04, 2016, 03:32:08 PM »
Basically I tie about five colour variations with a 70 or 50 denier thread and if I use a wire it is a .1 mm wire. Two coats of Spar Varnish cut 20% with acetone to penetrate the through the thread to the hook to finish the flies. They dont need to be absolutely smooth in finish because the naturals are not either.The hooks will vary from a standard gauge to a 2x wire the heavier being added weight. I seldom use metal beads unless my point fly is used to pull the cast down off a floating line which may or may not be using a Curly Q leader (greased with Gink or Muslin) indicator. The floating line is marked in 8 inch intervals (this is my usual indicator system or method- the British call this a Zebra line system) between the colour of the fly line and a black 8" section for 20 feet on the forward section of the line.All my flylines are marked out to seventy feet in ten foot intervals. Depending how deep I am fishing this will determine my leader length usually by 1.5 X the depth in water over 8 feet for deeper chironomid techniques. The leaders with a slightly weighted (being an undersized bead or a plastic 3mm bead) point fly drops the team slowly and I can then fish the entire water column on the way down to the maximum depth on each cast. Once depth is achieved which can be distinguished by the flyline or curly cue being pulled under water, I start a slow retrieve initially by lifting the rod to 60 degrees. Then I slowly drop the rod allowing the flies to drift back through the feeding zone. Pay attention to both the slow lift and the slow descent because fish will hit the flies in both directions. My team of flies would be a slightly weighted (under sized beads or 3mm plastics on a 2X strong hook...more so for weight rather than its ability to fight larger heavier fish) this is my anchor fly in a blood worm profile in Red or orange or yellow (amber) or light olives to a sulphur colour. The mid flies would be more of a pupal pattern with hot spots used at the wing bud positions and the top fly would be a spider style of pattern that is collared behind the hackle with a hot spot as well. The hot spots colours are determined by the time of day or the time of year. The latter comment is based on the over all season colours of foliage to the region. But this is only a basic suggestion for hot spot colours. The leaders are usually 4-6 pound test and are primarily made of monofilament unless the water is very clear. The flies initially would be five feet apart until the strike zone is determined, then the tags are compressed to two or maybe three foot intervals. With a lift of sixty degrees all the team can be moved through the strike zone when lifting or lowering the casts on the retrieve. From this style of presentation for chironomids the other two methods are a washing line system either top down or bottom up (modified leaders are shortened and are very light mono). The last method is a bung fly instead of an indicator (no hooks on indicators) if we are fishing pupas shallower than 3-4 feet. The bung fly usually resembles either a Travelling Sedge or is a popper fly with a foam head, both work well. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fg4YcH6GTmQ
« Last Edit: October 17, 2016, 02:13:52 PM by Gary Hanke »
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Ron Thompson

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Re: Tying chironomids
« Reply #8 on: August 11, 2016, 10:11:19 AM »
Wow Gary; thats why I like to fish for fun. Catch a fish big enough to pump and then match the chironomid size and color.
Fishing is not about fish.
THE TUG IS THE DRUG
Do you want flies with that order.
www.thekamloopsflyshop.blogspot.ca