Author Topic: Split shots  (Read 827 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Gerry Chervet

  • 3 Star Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 22
  • A.K.A. gerry613
    • View Profile
Split shots
« on: June 10, 2015, 06:19:32 AM »
Hi,
I was wondering how often you guys are using split shots.
I just came back from a week end at Lake placid NY , and I got an interesting discussion with this guy who cannot fly fish without using split shots.
I am honestly not use to it at all.
It was actually pretty successful to get  a #14 nymph at the very bottom of a quite strong stream.

Any thought on this ?

Todd Oishi

  • Administrator
  • 5 Star Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5156
  • Maple Ridge, B.C., Canada
    • View Profile
    • North American Loch-Style Fly Fishing Championship
Re: Split shots
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2015, 04:46:53 PM »
I prefer to use tungsten beads and wraps of lead, or addition beads that are buried under the dressing, to get my flies down in fast water. Split shot can effect the drift and reduce the contact with the fly due to the "hinging effect". But that being said; I'd use it if it works for you!

Cheers,
Todd
For me, the quality of a trout is not measured in inches or pounds, but rather by the journey and circumstances that allowed our paths to cross...

Randy Paskall

  • BCCFFL Member
  • 5 Star Member
  • *
  • Posts: 903
  • Wiley Coyote should have tried a fly rod!
    • View Profile
Re: Split shots
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2015, 05:45:25 PM »
I use them - before my comp days all the time.
What split can do for you is a bunch of things but I'll touch on a couple here and let you expound on my findings yourself and probably develop your own.
Firstly, they can get minute patterns down like soft hackles and the like where a bead would wreck the profile, and size itself inhibits the ability to add sufficient lead to a pattern to get it to where the fish are. Here in BC we only use one fly (we fish like MEN dammit) so we can't use other flies to sink another pattern.
Secondly finds me in disagreement with Todd's assessment of their drifting success. If I put 1 or 2 micro shot 8 to 12" up from a fly I'm getting it down and yet allowing the fly to move freely on the line between the shot and it - giving a better and truer drift than ahy weighted pattern alone can accomplish. The fly on the tippet itself with no weight will move freely in any micro currents available and as such is more apt to be interpreted as the real thing over a lead wrapped offering.
Next  is the jig option which really puts fish in the bag for me on pressured streams. Works best in plunge pools and the like I'll use a soft hackle and a heavier single shot, plop it into the feeder tongue of water into the pool and allow it to swing down and across, once the line/pattern is in front of me I'll use a heavy jigging action with the rod tip - pulling the leader, then allowing the shot to fall keeping in contact during the drop but trying not to impede the fall. Most strikes come just after the 'jig' and on the 'fall' back down so connection is essential.
I love doing this behind other 'purist' fly fisher with dries on the Skagit and other name streams, watching their faces when I pull out 3 to 5 healthy rainbows where they could rise nothing.... =)

Like anything else in fishing it deserves a spot in the vest along with many other comp unfriendly things when you are fishing for pleasure.
Sorry, but you weren't catching that fish anyway.....

Gerry Chervet

  • 3 Star Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 22
  • A.K.A. gerry613
    • View Profile
Re: Split shots
« Reply #3 on: June 30, 2015, 09:12:33 AM »
Thank you for your interesting points of view