Author Topic: Lake controler ???  (Read 1139 times)

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Bill Pollock

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Lake controler ???
« on: January 16, 2017, 11:43:21 AM »
We are holding the Canadian National championships here in Roblin the first week of June this year. I am in charge of lake controllers and would like a job description so that when I approach people to help out, I know how the answers to any questions they may have.
Thanks!!!

Todd Oishi

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Re: Lake controler ???
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2017, 07:31:52 PM »
Hi Bill!

What is the length and width of the boats that you will be using for this championship? The reason I ask is that controllers aren't normally used for loch-style fishing competitions, and if they're used, the boat should be at least 14 feet in length and 36" wide in order to accommodate 2 competitors and a controller (3 people).

In a typical loch-style competition, 2 competitors share a single boat and serve as the controller for the other competitor in their boat.

I hope this makes sense...

Todd



 

For me, the quality of a trout is not measured in inches or pounds, but rather by the journey and circumstances that allowed our paths to cross...

Bill Pollock

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Re: Lake controler ???
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2017, 06:51:22 AM »
OK, probably have the wrong terminology. We are not using people in the boats with the anglers, but have a person on shore at each lake, I guess a " lake captain's" duties is what I'm looking for. I fished in the twenty ten competition but wasn't concerned about that persons duties except we had to pick a boat #.

Todd Oishi

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Re: Lake controler ???
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2017, 08:24:04 AM »
    OK. If that's what you're looking for...

    The main person in charge at the lake venue is referred to as the "Sector Judge" for that venue. Since you'll have 5 lake venues, you'll need to appoint 5 sector judges. It's always wise to have an extra person or 2 at each venue to assist the sector judge.

    Here are a few of the chores that the Sector Judge is responsible for:

    - The Sector Judge must be on hand to meet and greet the competitors as soon as they arrive at the venue.
    - The Sector Judge must have the boat rotations and boat partner pairings in a sealed envelope to present to the competitors as soon as they arrive at the venue.
    - The Sector Judge must ensure that everyone has on their PFDs and eye protection before they're allowed to step foot into their boat.
    - The Sector Judge must ensure that a CSA Approved "boat safety kit" is in each boat before the start of each session.
    - The Sector Judge must signal the start and stop of the session, as well as the 90 minute point in the session, at which competitors can swap positions and control of the boat if they choose.
    - The Sector Judge must ensure that the drogues, measuring troughs, oars, motors and batteries are all in good working order, and have a few extras on hand.
    - The Sector Judge must be on hand at all times during the session in order to resolve any issues or to offer any medical assistance if needed.
    - The Sector Judge will be responsible for the collection and inspection of the score sheets before the competitors are permitted to exit their boats or leave the dock.
    - The Sector Judge is responsible for placing the score sheets into an envelope, sealing it, and then presenting it to the bus driver, so it can be delivered to the scorekeeper at the end of the day.[/li]


THE DRAW AND BOAT ASSIGNMENTS;
In the past, some of the organizers at our nationals just drew number out of an envelope or hat, but this procedure is extremely unfair and should be avoided at all costs!!! The random draw out of a hat allows a person the opportunity to fish with another person multiple times during a 5 session championship, which can be a great advantage if a higher-skilled competitor is drawn numerous times by another higher-skilled competitor (A BIG-TIME ADVANTAGE).

It can also have a severely negative impact on a lower-skilled or rookie competitor who will not have an equal opportunity or ability to learn and gain the advantages that are gained as a result of sharing a boat with a higher-skilled competitor (i.e. pairing lower-skilled competitors together will be far less effective in finding fish and techniques -in comparison to a boat with 2 highly-skilled competitors paired together).

Here's a perfect example of what I'm trying talking about:
A few years ago, friend of mine fished his very first nationals, and was very fortunate to have drawn a highly-skilled boat partners three times during the 5 sessions of his very first nationals. He was completely unfamiliar with the venue and having the opportunity to be partnered with a highly-skilled competitor that had fished it before placed him at a much greater advantage due to the other competitors local knowledge and experience on these venues.  At the conclusion of the championship, my friend finished in the medals (2nd place individually), which he fought hard for and fished very well to accomplish!

Another friend, who was is a fine angler, but also a rookie to the Nationals, drew the ghost angler (a lower-skilled, volunteer angler with nothing to offer) several times during the 5 sessions and a lower-skilled competitor for the other 2 sessions, which offered him absolutely no advantage at all, nor the opportunity to learn from the experience and place well. Without the advantage of sharing a boat with a higher-skilled or knowledgeable competitor, he finished right near the bottom in the standings and last in his group for this championship. I felt very bad for him, as he was really counting on learning from his boat partners as a result of his participation at Nationals.

It would have been a much more fair scenario and championship if had a proper rotation been used that placed everyone with a new partner for all 5 sessions. I use this format at the North American Loch-Style and Provincial Championships (5 sessions with 5 different boat partners), so no one will be placed at an advantage or disadvantage due to the "luck of the draw" that results when drawing from a hat to determine boat partners for a loch-style fishing championship...

The matrix used for the determining the boat rotation and assignment of boats and fishing partners is very simple a 5 session lake championship, and would less than an hour to create one, which in turn would reduce the workload on the Sector Judges and create a much more fair competition for all involved.

I'd be more than happy to assist you or provide a boat rotation for you as soon as you know exactly how many competitors you'll have at your event.

Cheers,
Todd
« Last Edit: January 17, 2017, 09:15:57 AM by Todd Oishi »
For me, the quality of a trout is not measured in inches or pounds, but rather by the journey and circumstances that allowed our paths to cross...

Bill Pollock

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Re: Lake controler ???
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2017, 03:16:59 PM »
Thanks loads. That leaves little in question.

Todd Oishi

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Re: Lake controler ???
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2017, 03:23:10 PM »
You're very welcome. As mentioned, please do a proper draw for boat partners, rather than pulling names out of a hat. That would be my main recommendation and I'm sure that others would support this decision.

Thanks,
Todd
For me, the quality of a trout is not measured in inches or pounds, but rather by the journey and circumstances that allowed our paths to cross...