Author Topic: Order of Operations  (Read 493 times)

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Christopher Krysciak

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Order of Operations
« on: February 09, 2017, 06:47:48 PM »
I've been reading through the "analyze this" forum and found it very interesting how everyone had their own twist on how best to effectively fish a given piece of water using a range of techniques. What I was curious to get people's take on was what order (and why) they use each given style of fishing. Say if I was going to fish a certain piece of water thoroughly, and I had decided to fish a nymph, dry, and streamer, with which techniques should I start and end on? Of course this could all vary based on time of year, hatches, time restrictions, and other variables, so let's hear what factors would alter this order as well.

For my own fishing if I determined that all three techniques would be applicable to a single piece of water and I was going to use them all I would most likely start out fishing a dry at range to test the waters, then I would run a nymph through it, followed by a streamer. The reasoning being that I can present the dry most delicately and without encroaching upon the holding water too much, then I could move closer up and work the nymph to pick up fish that wouldn't rise to the dry while still maintaining a reasonable amount of stealth (this is a generalization of course, with no particular type of water in mind), my last fly would be a streamer, as this will disturb the water the most and may pick up aggressive fish but could easily put down more weary fish that could instead be taken on the nymph/dry.

So what is your order of operations when it comes to approaching the water?

David Bisnett

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Re: Order of Operations
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2017, 05:38:15 AM »
I think alot of it depends upon the amount of fishing pressure that the water youre fishing generally receives.  When fishing lightly fished waters, I dont think it matters as much and you can base your selection or choice of strategy entirely upon weather, conditions, etc.  If the fishing pressure is heavy it is SO much harder to fool Trout anyway, e.g. The West Branch in the Catskills.  Of course, its always best to stay out of the water if you can to avoid being seen  but thats not always realistic. If possible, cast on land from a distance and hit the edges first with a dry if youre worried about spooking wary fish that have seen it all, then work the middle. IMHO, wading in slowly, gingerly and stealthily doesnt ruin your chances in most cases so  after fishing the edges with no luck, I step in and stay in as I work a piece of water.  Id stick with the dries on my way up/downstream, then maybe on the way back, switch to wets/nymphs, if still nothing, try a streamer!

Todd Oishi

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Re: Order of Operations
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2017, 07:41:30 AM »
Great topic, Christopher!

For my style of fishing, it really depends on the type of fish, as well as the nature, type, and depth of the water, with serious consideration given to the time of year and available food sources (hatches, flesh, eggs, terrestrials, etc... ).

In most cases, if I'm planning on spending a great amount of time on the stretch of water, and feel that it would be more effective to use a variety of techniques, I'd try to employ the techniques in an order of selection that would allow me the opportunity to most effectively cover the water without spooking the fish and putting them down...

Firstly, I'd start with a dry/dropper (or single dry if the regulations dictate the single fly approach), working upstream, close to the bank, so I won't have to enter the water.

Secondly, once I reach the top of my beat, I'd work back downstream using softhackles or wet flies.

Thirdly, once I'm back at the bottom of the beat, I'd work back upstream with nymphs and target the "lies" and locations where I'd suspect fish to be holding and/or feeding.

And finally, I'd work my way back downstream with a streamer and try to pick off any aggressive fish.

All things considered, I'd probably spend most of my time working the nymphs and rotating through my "go to" patterns - unless the fish are really keying in on the dries or wets of course...
For me, the quality of a trout is not measured in inches or pounds, but rather by the journey and circumstances that allowed our paths to cross...

Randy Clark

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Re: Order of Operations
« Reply #3 on: February 26, 2017, 04:22:27 PM »
Interesting subject, when I think about my process it usually involves some time just watching the water and in the case of new water turning over rocks and looking at the grass on the edge. From  there I decide on my method. Thins has me thinking I may track that over this season and compare the results.

Sreten Marić

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Re: Order of Operations
« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2017, 03:26:11 AM »
One question Todd if you have only 45 minutes and fishing place is 100m long. There is no time to use all ( dry, nymph and streamer)

Todd Oishi

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Re: Order of Operations
« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2017, 06:50:49 AM »
Depending on the time of year and if hatches are occurring I'd most likely use a nymph and cover the best water rehear than the entire beat. 45 minutes isn't much time and goes by very fast. A dry fly is another great option as you can cover more surface water if the fish are looking up and there's a hatch occurring.
For me, the quality of a trout is not measured in inches or pounds, but rather by the journey and circumstances that allowed our paths to cross...

Francois Dallaire

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Re: Order of Operations
« Reply #6 on: June 06, 2017, 02:37:54 PM »
Very interesting all.  Thanks for sharing!

Don't forget to consult your shadow. You can't nymph your way up a run if your shadow is at a 45 degree upstream in front of you.

There is what I want to do, and what my shadow will allow.  We get along most of the time but around 5 pm it's like he's had enough for the day and starts getting long and annoying.  I think he's doing it an purpose.

I usually just roll my eyes at him and start up stream and work my way down the run if he's in one of his bad moods.