Author Topic: Lockport, MB - March 30  (Read 803 times)

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Nick Laferriere

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Lockport, MB - March 30
« on: March 30, 2012, 07:25:29 PM »
Well I ventured out in that crazy wind today and hit up the river. Its down 3feet from last week! Sucks...its at late August levels and there's no more snow to fill it up. Better hope we get some April showers otherwise the levels are going to be terrible this season. =S

Anyways, I only fished about an hour and only managed to land one fish but it was a nice carp. Hooked him up first cast when I switched to my 7wt. Was about a 28" carp, not bad. Didn't fight at all! The cold water must really affect them. It didn't run at all and just kind of flopped around. lol. Still cool to catch one in March!




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Todd Oishi

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Re: Lockport, MB - March 30
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2012, 07:30:07 PM »
Very nice! What type of fly and presentation works best got carp Nick?
For me, the quality of a trout is not measured in inches or pounds, but rather by the journey and circumstances that allowed our paths to cross...

Nick Laferriere

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Re: Lockport, MB - March 30
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2012, 09:07:11 PM »
In the Red the water's so murky that you can't really effectively target carp. But most are caught on size 2-10 streamers or buggers. They're mostly an incidental catch.

In lakes and clear water rivers its easier to target them and flies similar to bonefish flies work good. The best way to think of them is blue-collar bonefish. They spook easily, aren't always eager to take a fly, and fight like crazy! Also its a good idea to drag a small glo-bug pattern behind your carp fly. They often will be attracted to the larger fly and instead take the glo-bug. Yellow and black are the best colours for glo-bugs.

Essentially what you want in a fly, is something that skips along the bottom and rides point up. By tying in lead or beadchain eyes on the top of the hook shank, it'll roll the fly so you are less likely to snag bottom. Also I've found, keeping the flies compact seems to work better than long streamer style flies. Small crayfish and leech patterns also work quite well. Stu Thompson's DDH Leech is a great pattern for carp.

Here's a couple patterns.
DDH Leech - dubbed body, beadchain eyes, marabou tail. Very easy and very effective! Tie in brown/orange, olive, yellow, black, and white for carp.


Carp fly from Hatches Mag - I really like the idea behind this fly! It'd be a perfect attractor pattern for carp!