Author Topic: November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec  (Read 1715 times)

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Bob Jurmain

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November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec
« on: November 20, 2014, 03:08:29 PM »


Trout fishing is almost over for the year.  We might get one more day in next Tuesday.  Although I should be able to get in a few days chasing Musky as the rivers are the last to freeze over. Above is my first Lake Trout on a fly  (It has been a year of firsts: Musky, Tiger, and now Laker).  I've caught two more since.  Mind you, it is the first time that I have targeted them.  This lake which I had not fished before is a bit further away has both Rainbows and Lakers (and a few Browns).  That day I also got a 4.4 pound RB (below).  The Lakers are quite sleek and have very sharp teeth! (not for bugs, I'm sure)



On a Brookie Lake nearby I also got this one on a PT nymph.



Now I have a question for you chubby trout chasers.  I theorize that I caught these larger fish because no-one else has been fishing the lakes recently. Prior to this I had also caught a 22 inch rainbow in a lake I've fished for 20+ years.  I had not caught such a trout in this lake but again, there was no evidence that anyone had been fishing there for some time.   Basically trout fishing has been so lousy in my area for the last three years that most fishers have given up.  It could be a number of factors but over harvesting is certainly one of them.  MNR has told me that they have been having trouble with their stocking and will be getting triploids from Washington State next year, so here's hoping.  My theory is that with no fishing the grandpas of the lake come out of hiding and become more vulnerable especially at this time of year.  No boat noises, etc.  What do you think of this idea?  I fish in a tube so I'm pretty stealthy.  I don't have a picture of that trout as I really didn't expect to catch anything for the hour I was there after fishing elsewhere earlier.

We did our Kenauk trip a bit earlier than last year to avoid the frozen fingers.  Temps were pretty good at +7C for one day and closer to freezing the other two.  Rented Green and Sugarbush.  In two full days I landed 34 rainbows, so not bad but lower than in the good ole days of 20+/day. Bill N tells me they are still trying for their hatchery and may get it with the new owners.  Coney Leech has been my best fly this Fall along with Orange Hammill's (Canadian style).


« Last Edit: November 20, 2014, 03:11:55 PM by Bob Jurmain »

Chris Puchniak

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Re: November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec
« Reply #1 on: November 20, 2014, 04:23:32 PM »
Nice pics!

I think that is a very valid theory.  There is nothing better for me than going to an unpressured lake some times.   You can go to a lake of fully wild fish (the best right? because they are well conditioned to recognize proper food items, etc...), and when they haven't seen a fly in a long time, you can pull out big fish cast after cast as if you were stocky fishing.  Unpressured fish can be slightly more gullible.

Add to that it is fall, and the fish KNOW they have to feed on whatever they can find, and the big fish can be pretty easy!

I think there is a reason fall is a favourite lake fishing time for those in the know.
I will fish anywhere and find beauty in it.

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Doug Thorpe

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Re: November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec
« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2014, 09:12:49 PM »
Sounds like a good theory. 

Could also be that due to no pressure on that lake over the past three years you are finding some 4-6 year old fish with awesome growth as they were not harvested in the past few years.
I chase the allure of standing in a river, casting dries in an attempt to watch that beast come up and take my fly.  Then I usually blow it by setting the hook to soon....

Bob Jurmain

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Re: November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec
« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2014, 07:06:05 AM »
The Advisory Council for Eastern Ontario is having a meeting next week and they will be presenting  broadscale netting in some of the trout lakes.   I've been grumping that the fishery is in terrible shape and I'm sure they will say,  "Look at all these big trout we got (and killed)!"  I will reply that you can't catch those trout except under extraordinary conditions as discussed above.   Not much said by the volunteers at this committee will amount to much.  They will only hear what they want to hear and do what the masters in the 'Center of the Universe' (Toronto) dictate. 
My immediate concern is the use of bait fish for bait and the real possibility of perch and sunfish being accidentally introduced.  I'm giving a brief presentation on the FLIPPR lakes.  A few jaws should drop on the pics of what is possible.  The chairman in Manitoba wrote to me that they are having problems with bait fish too in their trout lakes.  Quebec quickly outlawed it after VHS spread and for once they have done the right thing.  I don't think you allow it out there in B.C.
bj

Doug Thorpe

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Re: November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2014, 09:52:49 AM »
That is correct Bob.

In fact BC has taken it as far as banning the use of finfish for bait, live or dead.  An exception exists for set-linning in lakes of region  6 and 7a and sturgeon in region 2 but they must be dead with head removed or head only.
I chase the allure of standing in a river, casting dries in an attempt to watch that beast come up and take my fly.  Then I usually blow it by setting the hook to soon....

Gary Hanke

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Re: November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2014, 10:12:46 AM »
I don't ever recall the use of live Baitfish in Trout lakes in Alberta. I do recall decades back the use of dead or frozen baitfish in trout lakes, but that was removed years ago. Live Baitfish usage in Alberta has not existed in 40 plus years to my knowledge.I think you will always have an issue as we do with different species of fish showing up in the trout ponds and lakes that you enjoy. Many of our trout lakes in Alberta have perch in them. It is speculated that some people will purposely stock a lake with Perch, others have indicated that migratory birds will transport undesirable fish into a stocked lake....In any case I doubt any thing will stop or erase the movement of non desired fish from one body of water to another via legislation.

One thing that seems to help reduce perch in trout lake is the introduction of Tiger Trout. Having said that the Shelia Copps Law prevents us from doing that in Alberta. As a result we are not supposed to introduce non indigenous species into our water sheds. That is precisely why the Alberta Stocking Program under the watch of the Alberta Government stocks Rainbows, Browns, and Brookies in Alberta. LOL....I guess these species originate from Alberta.  8) But it does give credence that Tigers could be stocked if there was a political will to do so..to resolve perch issues in our trout lake, or at least a bit of an ability to keep them in check in a given body of water.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2014, 10:21:53 AM by Gary Hanke »
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Doug Thorpe

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Re: November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec
« Reply #6 on: November 21, 2014, 10:38:52 AM »
I find it funny how Alberta stocks the two species requires for tiger trout yet consinders it to be an exotic...
I chase the allure of standing in a river, casting dries in an attempt to watch that beast come up and take my fly.  Then I usually blow it by setting the hook to soon....

Gary Hanke

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Re: November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec
« Reply #7 on: November 21, 2014, 01:13:00 PM »
Doug I know and it doesn't stop there either. When you start looking a pheasants, Hungarian Partridge, Chukar Partridge, etc...It is just talking out the side of your mouth to when it suits your needs from a government point of view. Like I said if there is no political will, then it just doesn't happen.
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Bob Jurmain

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Re: November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec
« Reply #8 on: November 22, 2014, 04:08:32 PM »
The problem with these silly pronouncements coming from ministries is that the boss is often a token appointment knowing almost nothing.  They can get the best advise but who knows what will be basis of their decision, likely political. FLIPPR got their mandate because it was in the Ministers riding as well as a good idea. He was also a fisher.

« Last Edit: November 22, 2014, 06:31:46 PM by Bob Jurmain »

Bob Jurmain

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Re: November report for Eastern Ontario and Quebec
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2014, 07:43:03 PM »
I wrote my last post on a tablet, a most inconvenient machine.  I really don't know what all the fuss is about.  I can type about 50X faster on the good ole desktop keyboard.

Regarding Tigers, there is a very high failure rate getting the eggs to hatch, much more so than Splake, apparently.  I think that is why they are always C&R.  I've read that Brown Trout will eliminate all competitive species by targeting their young. This certainly happened on the Grand River up from Waterloo, Ont. near Fergus.  I met a very disappointed Bass fishers who told me it used to be a great Bass river until they stocked the Browns.

Another suggestion I heard was Tiger Musky.  They are sterile too.  Then you just have catch them in a year.

One other thing the chairman of FLIPPR told me and that is once they have enough lakes, they will stop the aeration in some lakes in order to have a winter kill.  That is how bad it has become with this 'accidental' introduction of Perch.   Perch mimic trout in all of their behavior and thereby eat all of the food the newly stocked minnows need.

I'm sorry to say that the only solution is a complete ban with severe penalties.  Some people just cannot be trusted to follow the rules.  Even with a ban, you will likely have to wait until those people who have used bait fish are out of the scene.  We don't have much enforcement and everyone knows it.  I just filled out the survey that OMNR posted but it is a pointless exercise, I'm sure.

bj