Author Topic: Elastic coiled strike indicator  (Read 4458 times)

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David Bisnett

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #15 on: June 27, 2018, 06:52:25 PM »
I like the knot idea but it was hard to see from the video, was the sighter made out of clear line or was it colored? Looked clear to me and even with knots , would be hard to see if true and even if up close don’t you think?

David Bisnett

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2018, 07:00:20 PM »
Also, the BMS sounds good but is VERY expensive!! Is the advantage that much greater in strike detection and hook up percentage to warrant the price difference ?
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Alex Berger

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #17 on: June 28, 2018, 02:53:45 AM »
- The sighter in the vifro was clear line. 

-BMS is 86 Yrds long. which goes a long way.  its Florocarbon and it sinks fast.  I have been using it for sometimes, it has helps me with the visibility.
"Oh I live to be the ruler of life not a slave..
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David Bisnett

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #18 on: June 28, 2018, 03:44:16 AM »
Ok, he mentions 2 knots in the leader, 1 big and 1 small: just regular square knots with 1 doubled up? Also , how far apart are they? Looked like about 18-24” maybe?

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Alex Berger

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #19 on: June 28, 2018, 05:25:49 AM »
18 to 20 would be correct.   

I believe BMS cost less in the UK: https://esoterictackle.co.uk/home/151-sunline-shooter-fc-sniper-bms-azayaka.html
"Oh I live to be the ruler of life not a slave..
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Alex Berger

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #20 on: July 03, 2018, 05:45:27 AM »
Hi Alex....
There is nothing static about fly fishing... there are only variations and as long as they work, they are acceptable.  Purists may raise an eyebrow but  in tight line nymphing have you ever tried to let your sighter rest on the in surface in slow currents?   You watch the sighter and detect the strike as well as you can do with elastic coil. 

At what speed you move your nymphs in the fast or slow currents?  does your rod tip leads the nymphs which means a drag?  Do your nymphs move at the speed of water and does this cost you detecting strikes?


Cheers, Alex
« Last Edit: July 03, 2018, 05:51:02 AM by Alex Berger »
"Oh I live to be the ruler of life not a slave..
Walt Whitman

Alex Argyros

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #21 on: July 04, 2018, 09:02:23 AM »
Hello Alex,

With the proviso that the rivers I fish most have tend to be much calmer than your beloved torrents, I've found that doing the opposite of leading--slowing down a bit so as to introduce a slight sag in my leader--actually improves the number of takes that I notice.  I simply look for the sag to change shape and then strike.  Of course, I strike a lot at nothing, and sometimes I strike at nothing and find a fish on my fly.  Such is life!

Alex

David Bisnett

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #22 on: July 06, 2018, 06:37:11 AM »
By chance, I ran into a gentleman from Quebec while fishing upstate last week. Turns out he is a member of the Canadian flyfishing team! We talked for awhile and gave me some tips / advice for euro nymphing. He was using a straight sighter with a 20’ leader and had multiple sections of sighter bicolored of course. He was telling me the advantage of the straight sighter over coil and/or other indicator nymphing methods is that basically as your skill level progresses, you can reach a point where you can almost detect strikes by feel and vibration of the rod . My sense is that while fishing close he’s deadly ; however, I think that further out , his effectiveness would diminish drastically. In some situations, due to structure , current etc. when your limited in terms of wading and you simply cannot reach water further out via Czech methods. In this case, versatility is the key and the ability to then throw on a thingamabobber , a coil and still catch trout consistently should not be overlooked . My feeling is that instead of changing leaders entirely while on stream, you can just throw on a thingamabobber to reach water further out and take off as needed when you can fish closer again.

Francois Dallaire

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #23 on: July 06, 2018, 07:09:46 AM »
David, I'm happy you ran into someone to clarify a few points in person.

I would (as politely as possible) correct you on the range aspect though.  There is a reason FIPS banned the super long leaders. The Spanish/French were fishing 60 foot leaders and did so very effectively. These extra long leaders were not preferred in deep unwadable water like one would first think. They are helpful in skinny water were approaching the fish and fishing the nymphs directly under the rod tip would spook them.

I'd encourage you to try it and see for yourself.


Alex Berger

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #24 on: July 07, 2018, 10:45:24 AM »
FIPS was correct to ban long leaders...the  anglers in the Pyrenees did not use 60' long leaders!  As with most things,  by the time the concept of tight line nymphing crossed the Atlantic,  the leaders became longer because someone wanted to market long per-fabricated  leaders, colored indicators and sighters to North American anglers. (huge market!)   

The tight line nymphing means there is a tight line between the rod tip and the nymphs (not a 60' leader); i.e. there is direct contact with the nymphs at all times.                       Earliest tight line nymphing we know was originated in Europe goes back to 1400's.  Today this method is only practiced in Val Sesia, Val D'Aosta (Italian-French Alps.)    The method is called "Valsesiana"  where  they use wooden rods  and the strike is detected only by watching the rod tip.(no sighters, indicators or thingobobbers)    You  may note this is strictly tight line nymphing....Here are a few examples,  the parlance is in Italian but the videos that are self explanatory.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMGEBV77Rl4
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFpawcxcq3E
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OzmYhGXpNNg
« Last Edit: July 07, 2018, 10:34:15 PM by Alex Berger »
"Oh I live to be the ruler of life not a slave..
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David Bisnett

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #25 on: July 08, 2018, 06:50:50 AM »
I’m not sure how the french leader stretching out so far would work any more effectively if fishing that far away from the trout unless one were to use some kind of sight indicator such as a coil, Bonner, etc. there’s no way you can detect strikes by feel at that distance or see small subtle movements in line that you can up close.

Francois Dallaire

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #26 on: July 08, 2018, 10:40:01 AM »
You can. Try it :)

David Bisnett

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #27 on: July 08, 2018, 12:09:18 PM »
But Only if the leader line is off the water though can you detect the strike without a visual aid which limits your practical range correct?

Francois Dallaire

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #28 on: July 08, 2018, 02:41:45 PM »
The further the harder, no question there.  Lets go to imaginary land for a second and pretending we have a leader a million times thiner  than a spider web line with one million pounds breaking strenght.  You could nymph hundredes of feet away with no drag!

Now back to the real world... We dont have these lines so how far can you nymph with the technoligy we have? The answer according to FIPS: to far. We are putting in a rule to stop you guys. Twice the rod length, max.

There isn't much debate to be had. You  can very effectively nymph, tight line style from very far. The proof? They put a rule in to stop us.

Again, try it. No better way to see for yourselves!

Cheers!
Francois




David Bisnett

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Re: Elastic coiled strike indicator
« Reply #29 on: July 09, 2018, 04:38:28 AM »
I watched the first video of the Italian guy nymphing upnin the alps somewhere; looked almost like a Japanese remakes rod , no reel, LONG rod, maybe 14 feet? He was detecting takes by rod vibration I believe. Ideally, the longer the rod, the further away you can effectively tightline nymph. Too bad you couldn’t get a telescopic rod that could gradually lengthen out to 30 feet lol 😝