Author Topic: Chironomid  (Read 341 times)

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Ralph Anderson

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Chironomid
« on: June 30, 2020, 12:41:08 PM »
 I just started tying and fishing chironomids last year . Managed to finally catch one trout on a bloodworm pattern . I have seen a very good hatch of chironomids but they were very tiny , my size 16 chironomid was no where even close . On another lake I was at there were some chironomid husks on the water they appeared to be about size 14 to me . The hatch was over and I had missed it . My question is can you size a fly off a husk ? Will an empty husk shrink or elongate ? Would it even be worth trying a chironomid if the hatch was over .

Chris Puchniak

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Re: Chironomid
« Reply #1 on: June 30, 2020, 07:42:57 PM »
I am not precisely sure how the size of the husk relates to the size of the chironomid, but I would always think the husk would be a size bigger.  This would be because the husk gets expanded just prior to emergence as the chironomid gets larger due to gas accumulation.  I would also think that the splitting process would make it look bigger too.  But the size difference may not be significant.

I would always start with the husk size and then scale down from there.  Often there is nothing wrong with being one size or so bigger than the hatch as long as you have the profile, color, and movement matched.  Being a bit bigger only frequently helps your fly get noticed (though it might not be so beneficial if there is a lot of fishing pressure, in which smaller and more subtle would often be best).

Chironomid fishing can be so finicky with respect to depth (especially for rainbows which are much more prone to staying at one depth) and color.
I will fish anywhere and find beauty in it.

Don't be a Pessimist. Don't be an Optimist.  Be a Realist and change when you need to.

Marc Bilan

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Re: Chironomid
« Reply #2 on: July 03, 2020, 12:34:23 PM »
Hey Ralph,
         When I first started fishing chronies it was a process to get to 'confident'.  Not all lakes are created equal when it comes to hatches, or the fishes willingness to take immitations.  I fished a lake this spring where they would take a chronie sometimes, but a balanced micro leech ALL the time!  Another lake, they wanted chronies all day.  What you can do to stack the odds in your favor is to choose clear water lakes, or to choose lakes that have a large population of fish(usually meaning the fish size is smaller as an average).  In the case of the latter, when you do something correct you will generally get rewarded for it.  You can find these lakes by looking in your fishing regulations book and looking for expanded retention quotas for specific bodies of water.  If you fish a true trophy lake looking for monsters in the 5-10lb class, you can do everything right and still not land a fish for a few hours at a time.  Especially when you're figuring out a body of water. 
          Lastly, do a bit of digging(Flybc.ca is a great site for chronie patterns) and get a few confidence patterns.  A couple that are sure to catch you something are the Black and red, and Gunmetal and red using white, or black beads.  If I get a husk off the water and have nothing else to go on, I match it for size.  For rainbows especially, start 6-24 inches off the bottom depending on if there are weeds or not.
         Focus on chronies in the spring time, summer is usually poor.  Fall there is a minor hatch if you time it right.   Where are you from?
« Last Edit: July 03, 2020, 12:36:21 PM by Marc Bilan »

Ralph Anderson

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Re: Chironomid
« Reply #3 on: July 03, 2020, 04:44:10 PM »
I am from Saskatoon . I have been fishing mostly in the Parklands Manitoba . The lake I caught the trout on the bloodworm was Barbe Lake , it was also the first lake I caught a fish on a balanced leech as well . Haven't been to Manitoba this year because of the COVID travel restrictions . I believe they have opened up just recently so I'm hoping to go very soon . Even though I don't do very well fishing chironomids  I still really enjoy tying them . There seems to be no end of chironomids patterns to tie . Today i was tying snow-cones with white tungsten beads , dark gray glitter thread bodies and silver micro flashabou ribs . Its hard to believe big fish go for such little flies but I see it all the time on YouTube . One day I will be lucky and be on the right lake at the right time to see for myself .

Marc Bilan

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Re: Chironomid
« Reply #4 on: July 04, 2020, 04:43:41 PM »
Keep in mind that the 'hatch' you see on the water was probably staging just off the bottom of the lake for up to 3 days before you saw the shuck.  Shortly after lake turn over til the dragons crawling out of the water in early to mid June is generally a good time to fish a chronie...anytime.  Even when I don't see a 'hatch' per say.  Keep with it, it's worth it. :)

Ralph Anderson

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Re: Chironomid
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2020, 06:07:57 PM »
  I just returned from a fishing trip in Manitoba . The lake I was fishing had both trout and perch . Couldn't catch any of the trout on a chironomid , but I caught countless tiny perch . They were small but it was fun .