Author Topic: kakisa river  (Read 691 times)

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NWT fly fisherman

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kakisa river
« on: March 17, 2013, 11:12:14 AM »
i was wandering how many others have got the chance to fish on kakisa? it is an awesome river that is loaded with grayling in the spring! it used to be rather expensive to fly to hay river from yellowknife but now the mckenzie river bridge is open yellowknifers will be driving across weekly.

Jim Epp

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Re: kakisa river
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2013, 08:18:49 PM »
I'm making plans to be there again this year. Hopefully they will continue the study this year. It was not only fun but has been informative. I would like to make a small correction to your statement. I agree the river is awesome, the fish are very good, about as big & beautiful as any grayling I've run into, many over 40 cm FL. As for the river being "Loaded with them" I got to question that statement. The run has been studied since the early 70's & reading through some of the older studies it appears to me that the quantity of fish is on the decline in recent years. I have found no answers & it does seem to be a bit of a puzzle. In fact angling pressure in the 70s & 80s was much greater than it is today. I have heard stories from friends that lived in Pine Point that the Kakisa was where it was at during the grayling run. Though the gatherings probably involved more Beer than fish. Anyone that managed to make it the the river & catch a grayling promptly invited it back to camp as honoured guest at the BBQ. It was the bad old days. After the closing of the Pine Point mine (3 hrs away) in the late 80s pressure dropped right off. The only notable population near enough to have any impact is from Hay River (1 hr drive). I'm not sure the bridge will have a lot of effect after all it is a 7 hr drive from Yellowknife. There is an initiative to designate this river as catch & release. Grayling should respond very well to C&R & I fully support this initiative. A couple of other changes to the river since the 70s are that the spawning run is a couple of weeks earlier than in past years (climate change?) & there has been an increase of round whitefish following the grayling into the river (egg predation?). Questions that need answers. All of these negative things being said it is still a great fishery. A competent angler should be able to have a great day provided you can figure out the tricks. That's for you to figure out, my lips are sealed. Remember please, respect the fish. As I have said before there is still some mortality in C&R and if you are fishing the river recreationally limit your catch & you will limit your kill.

NWT fly fisherman

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Re: kakisa river
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2013, 08:38:41 PM »
I do agree that the studies show that the river has been on the decline and hey're have been fewer but it does'nt mean that it is slow fishing a quote from a friend "it's not a question if you will catch a grayling its wether or not you'll catch 30 or 40 fish". I do think the white fish would be fo eggs as there are people who hit some on egg patterns. And trust me there will be a rather large bit of yellowknifers even for a 6 1/2 hour drive. When will you go down and with who?

Jim Epp

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Re: kakisa river
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2013, 08:55:25 PM »
Anybody catching 30-40 fish a day & releasing them is statistically killing 2 fish. I believe that is over the limit for that river.